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Bachelor Of Creative Technologies (Game Art)

Billy Blue College of Design

If you love games and want to create breathtaking environments and characters for one of the biggest industries in the world, then Game Art is for you.

The Bachelor of Creative Technologies (Game Art) will develop your artistic style and technical skills through a combination of traditional art practices and the use of industry standard software. You will create beautiful environments and characters and use these assets to develop immersive experiences in an industry that is bigger than music and box office industries put together!

Throughout the course you will work alongside lecturers who will offer you practical industry insights and collaborate with other game artists and programmers to develop an industry-level game.

CAREERS IN GAME ART

  • Game Artist
  • 3D Modeler
  • Animator
  • Texture Artist
  • Environment Artist
  • Character Artist
  • Technical Artist
  • Art Director
  • Creative Director

QUICK COURSE GUIDE

Qualification Title BACHELOR OF CREATIVE TECHNOLOGIES (GAME ART)    

Study Options – Domestic Australian students

Full-time Blended*

Part-time Blended*

Full-time Online

Part-time Online

*Blended - face to face on campus plus facilitated online

Study Options - International students

Full-time Blended*

*Blended - face to face on campus plus facilitated online (no more than 30% online)

Start Dates

February, June, September

Course Length

Full-time: 3 years

Accelerated: 2 years

Part-time: 6 years

Admission Criteria

Year 12 with minimum ATAR 60 or equivalent.

Special Entry Requirements

Demonstrated ability to undertake study at this level:

  • Work experience, and/or other formal, informal or non-formal study attempted and/or completed, OR

  • Design portfolio (6-10 pieces of original creative work)

Entry Requirements for Overseas Students

IELTS (Academic) score of 6.0 minimum or equivalent, with no skills band less than 5.5.

Payment Options - Domestic Australian students

Upfront payment

This means tuition fees will be invoiced each trimester and payment is required on or before the due date.

FEE-HELP

FEE-HELP is Australian Government’s loan scheme for higher education degree courses.

It can assist you in paying for all, or part of, your course fees. Repayments commence via the tax system once your income rises above a minimum threshold. Just like with any other debt, a FEE-HELP debt is a real debt that impacts your credit rating.

PAYMENT OPTIONS - INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS

Upfront payment

This means tuition fees will be invoiced each trimester and payment is required on or before the due date.

Course study requirements

Each subject involves 10 hours of study per week, comprising 3 hours of facilitated study and 7 hours self-directed study.

Assessment

Practical assignments, research projects, presentations and reports.

Location

Sydney Campus

Brisbane Campus

Melbourne Campus

Provider

Torrens University Australia

Provider obligations

Torrens University Australia is registered as a self-accrediting Australian university by the Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency (TEQSA).

Accrediting body

Torrens University Australia Ltd

Course Fees

For details, please click here

CRICOS Course Code

095346K

Key Dates

2019 course dates for all Billy Blue classes held at our Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane campuses.

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Start Dates Census Dates Last Day Breaks
Mon 7 Jan 2019 18 Jan 27 Feb 18 Feb – 25 Feb
Mon 25 Feb 2019 15 Mar 19 May 20 May – 9 June
Mon 10 June 2019 28 June 01 Sep 2 Sep – 15 Sep
Mon 16 Sep 2019 4 Oct 8 Dec 9 Dec – 16 Feb 2020
Mon 04 Nov 2019 25 Nov 9 Feb 23 Dec – 05 Jan 2020

Course Structure

The course structure comprises 6 common core subjects, 10 specialised subjects and 7 elective subjects over levels 100, 200 and 300, as follows:

Level 100 2 core subjects 4 specialisation subject
Level 200 2 core subjects 4 specialisation subject
Level 300 2 core subjects 2 specialisation subject + 1 elective

Course rules

To be awarded the Bachelor of Creative Technologies (Game Art), students must complete 240 credit points over 24 subjects. Each subject has a value of 10 credit points, with one subject having a value of 20 credit points (PRO302 Production Capstone 2).

COURSE SUBJECTS - Bachelor Of Creative Technologies (Game Art)

This introductory subject places design process and practice within the context of a chronological survey of major historical eras of influence. Students are encouraged to engage with the historical socio-political movements influencing design trends of each era through research and reflection. Academic skills (research, referencing, essay writing, and sentence structure) and design software skills are taught in weekly lessons. Students use the academic and software skills to document historical research and generate creative responses to the themes of historical eras

The subject introduces the student to various aspects of the elements of design, e.g. materiality, form and shape, colour, positive and negative space etc. utilised in creative problem solving. Initially students are introduced to a design development process, from the tangible to the digital; through paper model making with its inherent skills development and risk taking, then on to further digital development using newly introduced software. Concurrent, weekly, individual homework tasks focus on understanding and appreciation of materials, their many varied uses, properties and the manufacturing processes related to them. Students will make incremental progress towards choosing a material in which their individual design can be realised. The submission will include a material and colour folio. The final submission will be a model executed in an appropriate material with its function/usage contextualised with all relevant information gleaned throughout the trimester.

Asset Creation utilises traditional art and design foundational theories and contextualises these practices for the digital domain. Students create artefacts in digital formats for a variety of outcomes, including the following: Concept Art, Pixel Art, Vector Art, Sprite Creation and other digital native formats utilised in the production of video game development. As part of this, students learn to critique and to be critiqued from peers and lecture staff alike in order to understand art and design from a variety of perspectives

Game Design Principles introduces students to game design foundations, techniques and paradigms through a series of lectureled and student-led activities. Students will explore game design principles through the analysis of existing game artefacts, applying those findings to the development of their own games. Students are introduced to a variety of analysis, development and presentation techniques encouraging discussion, creation and dissemination of their design choices through prototyping and documentation

3D Asset Creation expands on the knowledge gained in the 2D Asset Creation (ACR101) and allows the students to utilise industry standard 3D modelling tools and techniques to communicate complex ideas and emotions. Students will critique artefacts which utilise the concepts or form, function, and silhouette learned through the underpinning knowledge gained in the previous components.

Game Production Foundation combines art assets and basic scripting, enabling students to recognise how user experience is affected through art, design, and code. Utilising game development techniques and tools, students will create their own games, which requires a multifaceted approach including the following: project management, art and design theory, user interaction, menu systems, audio integration, scripting, game design and release. These trans-disciplinary artefacts scaffold the student’s knowledge for when they will interact with the Bachelor of Software Engineering students.

Problem-based learning (PBL) is a pedagogical approach that enables students to learn while engaging actively with meaningful problems. Students are given the opportunities to problem-solve in a collaborative setting, create mental models for learning, and form self-directed learning habits through practice and reflection. The underpinning philosophy of PBL is that learning can be considered a “constructive, self-directed, collaborative and contextual” activity. The principle of construct positions students as active knowledge seekers and co-creators who organise new relevant experiences into personal mental representations with the help of prior knowledge. This is further reinforced by social theories of learning that advance the merits of social interaction in cognitive development. The aim of this subject is to trigger student learning with a problem which needs resolution. Students make connections to the challenge by activating their individual and collective prior knowledge and finding resources to make sense of the phenomenon; they also engage in peer learning through small-group discussions and consolidate their learning through reflective writing. Beyond enabling students to make sense of the concepts and subject matter, this learning experience will also help students develop an understanding of themselves and their contexts, and the ways and situations in which they learn effectively.

he myth of innovation is that brilliant ideas leap fully resolved from the minds of geniuses. The reality is that most innovation comes from a process of rigorous examination through which great ideas are identified and developed before being realised as new offerings and capabilities. This subject introduces Problem Based Learning (PBL), mapped out as the 'Double Diamond’, the collaborative process by which the designer’s sensibilities and methods are employed to integrate the needs of people, the possibility of technology and the requirement for business success. In short, Double Diamond approach converts need into demand. It’s a human-centred approach to problem-solving that focuses thinking about meanings instead of features, searching for radical changes instead of improvements and proposing visions instead of satisfying existing needs. Today, designers across many disciplines share some similar approaches to the creative process. Every design specialist has a different approach and way of working, but there are some commonalities in their creative process. Divided into four distinct phases – Discover, Define, Develop and Deliver – the Double Diamond is a simple visual map which illustrates the PBL approach

Game Studies introduces students to the study of video games as texts situated within wider cultural and theoretical settings. Students will explore histories of video games as creative technologies and as cultural artefacts. These ideas will be framed through critical analysis of specific case studies, informed by a wider reading of contemporary games scholarship. Through a series of lecture and seminar-based talks, discussions and play sessions, students are encouraged to explore and discuss the wider context of the game industry in relation to the economic, social and cultural determinants surrounding the production & consumption of games & game technology.

Advanced 3D builds upon the knowledge gained in the 3D Asset Creation (ACR103). It introduces techniques in content creation pipelines to deliver solutions involved in 3D game productions. It also teaches advanced modelling and texturing techniques to enhance workflow. Students will learn digital sculpting software. Additional topics covered will include how to retopologise models and utilise various tools to enhance production speed and quality. They will learn how to optimise their models for a variety of applications and enhance their technical abilities by working with basic scripting, lighting, shaders, particles and various other pipeline requirements utilised in interactive media.

Animation teaches techniques used to create efficient animations for interactive media. The topics covered are animation theory, prop, weapon and environment animation. Additionally, character, facial animation and motion capture topics are covered including cinematic topics and technical limitations. Alongside it teaches the process of how to create rigs and technical art for games. This will provide the student with the technical skills to solve or enhance art and design assets. Topics also covered in the class will include integration into game engines and advanced scripting. Students will learn the basic terminology of how to optimise their technical art skills for a variety of applications.

The goal of this subject is to provide the students with an opportunity to collaborate on a series of projects, enhance collaborative skills working within a team of people across multiple disciplines. Additionally, the assignments in this subject will challenge the student in finding creative solutions to project management and small scale rapid game creation. Students will be asked to create various 3D game prototypes over the duration of the subject and present their work. They will work within a group that will involve Bachelor of Software Engineering students. This will introduce team dynamics where multiple disciplines are involved.

cial Enterprise is an exciting theoretically-based subject that is driven by the desire to create positive change through entrepreneurial activities. These activities harness design thinking and problem-solving processes in the realisation of pragmatic, viable project proposals from initiation to client presentation. By providing students with a framework to understand business model generation and the skills to source, evaluate, and measure opportunities through systematic research and competitor analysis, Social Enterprise empowers students to conceptualise, develop and propose new ventures and products that focus primarily upon social change for good. In addition, this subject will help students understand and address the practical challenges of working within this environment; to analyse different entrepreneurial business strategies, to explore diverse funding strategies, as well as incorporate theoretical discussions on major trends and issues in the social economy. Social Enterprise enables students to appreciate the power of creativity in problem-solving and the importance of the designer’s role in making a difference and precipitating change.

Pre-Production focuses on the skills and abilities required to formulate a group and manage the pre-production of a game development project. Areas of attention will be creative thinking and project scope. The team goal is to reach and agree upon an understanding of the strength and weakness of their chosen team. The said team will decide on the game they choose to develop. The team needs to be able to communicate the project, idea and scope through presentation, documents and a playable prototype. The pre-production submissions are designed to gear the students towards the start of future productions

Production provides the framework to allow iteration on the team’s design from Pre-Production (PPR301). The team will need to work efficiently and adhere to a schedule to be successful in this subject. The quality of the implementation, and the development processes undertaken will affect the final grade. Students will utilise the best practices learnt during the course. This subject gives the students the ability to refine, bug fix, and promote their projects, both internally and externally.

This subject is designed to provide students with professional experience in an area related to their field of study or the career they are working towards. The aim of providing industry-specific opportunities is to enable students to develop skills that will enhance their prospects of gaining meaningful employment and building their career for the future. Much of the benefit of work integrated learning comes from observation, practicing under supervision and reflection. Work Integrated Learning is an excellent way to broaden the students learning environment while they are studying. It allows them to see first-hand how what they are learning in their degree translates into practice, as well as how ‘real world’ practice relates to what they are learning at University. This subject will develop work ready skills and boost students’ employability while they are studying.

There are two work integrated learning options available to students:

  • Option 1: Internship Students are offered the opportunity to work within a professional design environment for an extended period of time. It encourages students to build long-term relationships with the design industry and exposes them to the rigour of applied design practice while building their confidence in adapting to new environments. It also provides a context in which to enhance their communication skills and work collaboratively in a professional arena. Students will undertake a series of research tasks, conducting interviews and gathering data in order to understand the key concepts in managing a professional design practice with emphasis placed on the operation of the professional design environment.

  • Option 2: Industry Live Brief This subject requires students to respond to criteria set within the context of an Industry Live Project. An understanding of research methodologies appropriate to professional practice and the documentation of personal creative investigation will be explored. Students will also further investigate and examine entrepreneurial and commercial opportunities through collaborative work practice. The subject is delivered from a cross discipline perspective and draws on both discipline specific and common design practices. Students are required to work both independently or as part of a collaborative team in order to conduct research, analyse and define project parameters and deliver innovative solutions that expand the notion of an industry live brief.

 

 

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Frequently asked questions - Bachelor of Creative Technologies (Game Art)

Yes, all Torrens University Australia qualifications are government-accredited and nationally recognised. In addition, Torrens University Australia maintains close industry links.

The University provides you with the opportunity to seek work experience while you study, and also ensures that you graduate with a professional portfolio that can land you serious work.

Torrens University Australia has campuses located in Sydney, Brisbane, Melbourne and Adelaide. All campuses are centrally situated, close to public transport and cultural/commercial precincts enabling ease of access and connection to services.

There are three major intakes per year for each Torrens University Australia course, plus special, mid-term intakes may also be available. You can enrol anytime during the year and start in the semester of your choice. However, do note that there is a maximum of 25 students per class so it’s important you enrol early to secure your place.

Contact your consultant now for information on available spots in the next intake.

Students are encouraged to bring a laptop to class with the following hardware:

  • Intel Core i5 processor 2.2GHz or higher
  • 16GB RAM recommended; 8GB minimum
  • 25GB SSD or higher
  • Gigabit Ethernet network & IEEE 802.11a/b/g/n compatible WiFi
  • Operating System: Windows 10 (64-bit)
  • Graphics card: Nvidia GTX 1060 or better
  • Tablet: Wacom Intuos Draw or better

Internet access is required for software activation and validation of subscription, as well as to online services.