Billy Blue College of Design
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Bachelor Of Media Design

Billy Blue College of Design

This course offers budding designers the opportunity to acquire a broad set of real-world skills, combining specialist knowledge with technical prowess to produce graduates that are dynamic and employable. You’ll learn how to adapt to different environments by working both individually and collaboratively on creative projects that reflect industry processes. You will receive an introduction to the world of design and graduate with the skills and experience needed to undertake a position within the creative media industries.

Careers in 3D Design and Animation

  • Advertising agencies
  • Application Development Studios
  • Architectural firms (signage, wayfinding, information design)
  • Book publishing firms
  • Branding companies
  • Corporate public relations departments
  • Emerging technology development firms
  • Fashion design studios (illustration, print design and/or promotions)
  • Film and television studios
  • Interactive design companies (interface design, illustration, and/or animation)
  • Governmental communications departments
  • Graphic design studios
  • Industrial design studios
  • Interface Developers
  • Multimedia companies
  • Newspapers and magazines
  • Packaging design studios
  • Software development companies (mobile applications, interface design)
  • Software publishers
  • Textile manufacturers (print designs)
  • Usability testing developers
  • User Interface Developers
  • Web design companies
  • In a variety of other commercial companies as in-house designers

QUICK COURSE GUIDE

Qualification Title BACHELOR OF MEDIA DESIGN    

Study Options – Domestic Australian students

Full-time on campus

Study Options - International students

Full-time on campus

Start Dates

February, June, September

Course Length

Full-time: 3 years

Accelerated: 2 years

Admission Criteria

Admission to the Bachelor of Media Design is primarily based on the quality of your portfolio, which must be submitted with your application. You will also need to have met the minimum entry criteria for the University which include:

  • Completion of SACE (or equivalent high school qualification) and/or

  • A Certificate IV or above from a Registered Training Provider, and/or

  • Completion or partial completion of a bachelor degree or above, and/or

  • Completion of an eligible Foundation course, and/or

  • A Special Tertiary Admission Test (STAT) rank of 155 or more.

Applying for the Adelaide campus If you are applying to study the (Bachelor of Applied Public Health/ Bachelor of Business/ Bachelor of Business (Sport)/Bachelor of Commerce/Bachelor of Media Design) at our Adelaide campus, you’ll need to complete a SATAC application.

Visit http://www.satac.edu.au/undergraduate to apply. This is not required for online or postgraduate students. If you need help with your application, call 1300 575 803 or email enquiries@tua.edu.au. If you need help from SATAC, visit www.satac.edu.au/enquiries Make sure you check the important dates to ensure you get your application in on time.

Approved English tests include:

  • IELTS 6.0 (Academic), with no sub score less than 5.5

Payment Options - Domestic Australian students

Upfront payment

This means tuition fees will be invoiced each trimester and payment is required on or before the due date.

FEE-HELP

FEE-HELP is Australian Government’s loan scheme for higher education degree courses.

It can assist you in paying for all, or part of, your course fees. Repayments commence via the tax system once your income rises above a minimum threshold. Just like with any other debt, a FEE-HELP debt is a real debt that impacts your credit rating.

PAYMENT OPTIONS – INTERNATIONL STUDENTS

Upfront payment

This means tuition fees will be invoiced each trimester and payment is required on or before the due date.

Course study requirements

Each subject involves 10 hours of study per week, comprising 3 hours of facilitated study and 7 hours self-directed study.

Assessment

Practical assignments, research projects, presentations.

Location

Adelaide Campus

Provider

Torrens University Australia

Provider obligations

Torrens University Australia is registered as a self-accrediting Australian university by the Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency (TEQSA).

Accrediting body

Torrens University Australia Ltd

Course Fees

For details, please click here

CRICOS Course Code

095347J

Key Dates

2019 course dates for all Billy Blue classes held at our Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane campuses.

Start Dates Census Dates Last Day Breaks
Mon 7 Jan 2019 18 Jan 27 Feb 18 Feb – 25 Feb
Mon 25 Feb 2019 15 Mar 19 May 20 May – 9 June
Mon 10 June 2019 28 June 01 Sep 2 Sep – 15 Sep
Mon 16 Sep 2019 4 Oct 8 Dec 9 Dec – 16 Feb 2020

Course Structure

The course structure comprises 19 core subjects and 3 elective subjects over Levels 100, 200, and 300, as follows:

Level 100 6 core subjects
Level 200 6 core subjects 1 elective subject
Level 300 4 core subjects 1 elective subject

Course rules

Students must study 18 subjects as set out in the table (course structure) to be awarded the Bachelor of Media Design.

COURSE SUBJECTS - BACHELOR OF MEDIA DESIGN

A systematic introduction to essential design elements and principles across the domain of media design – students are introduced to critical thinking, philosophies, methodology, processes of documentation, presentation and referencing, in order to identify and discuss the theories and concepts exhibited in design work from various design specialisations. Knowledge of principles and methods is applied to effectively develop and communicate creative ideas visually, verbally and in written form.

A fundamental introduction to design studio practice where students apply theories and principles learnt in Design Principles. A range of mostly analogue tools are utilised to create visual solutions to design problems and acquire the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary to work independently or collaborate across design media. Creative problem-solving methods are presented using a combination of guided class exercises, group work, class discussions and self-directed investigative tasks. Students respond to creative briefs, critique and reflect on the work of their peers within workshop, studio and lab environments. Experience with experimentation with analogue media and design principles where outcome is secondary to phenomena, process and discovery, in order to develop independent critical thinking skills and the ability to look beyond the ordinary.

An introduction to some major historical contexts influencing contemporary design practices and fundamental theoretical knowledge of the roles, processes and approaches of the major design disciplines within the media communications industry.

In combination with other components, students are introduced to the idea of using a critical position in response to contextual study to develop imaginative and relevant approaches to visual communication. Students also acquire the knowledge and skills to identify the content, media, processes and context of a chosen subject and relate it to contemporary practices and ethical considerations

An introduction to the roles, aims, processes and approaches of the major disciplines within photography, including the relationship between composition and visual narrative. Students focus on developing fundamental technical photographic skills and identify contexts for the work to operate in order to convey/support a narrative or aesthetic and meet the specifications of a brief. Students use photography to explore concepts and contexts identified in Contextual Studies 1 or identify another topic with a relationship to photography.

Digital Image Foundation focuses on providing a basic technical vocabulary and skillset for digital image making, providing a foundation for effective practices in all Media Design disciplines. Students are introduced to common industry-standard software packages used in the production of digital imagery such as Photoshop and Illustrator through practical exercises.

Students independently implement a multi-part interdisciplinary project integrating practices from all majors. The project is carried out within tight technical and creative limitations, giving students practical experience working in a commercial design environment. Independent and reflective thinking, personal responsibility, time management and practical skills are developed using a project-based learning approach.

This component introduces students to a framework for developing good personal scholarly inquiry skills and the knowledge necessary to undertake postgraduate studies or pursue a career of life-long learning, critical thinking, and inquiry within their professional domain. This is supported with class exercises and debate. Students use intellectual standards and critical thinking skills to analyse the work of other Media Designers.

Students enhance their ideas and their abilities to pitch, critique and defend ideas in class, resulting in a proposal document which may be supported with a pitch/critique presentation.

Lecturers facilitate debates to enhance the students’ ability to attack, defend and present ideas. They provide a collection of inquiry-based approaches to investigation, enhancing student awareness of personal critical thinking processes and biases. Lecturers present the pros and cons of various approaches in different contexts and facilitate discussion.

Students undertake critical reading and writing exercises in order to strengthen investigative skills. Students deconstruct paragraphs critically in order to understand their effective construction for essay writing. Intellectual standards provide a framework for students to attack and defend paragraphs.

Students progressively build an annotated bibliography of related works; students are given feedback on their works. Students develop and present a hypothesis or personal position based on analysis of their bibliography for discussion

An introduction to theoretical and technical knowledge across creative media strategies including creative industry processes and approaches, marketing communication, and campaign development. Subjects include different areas of marketing communications, the media involved, the concepts of creative advertising, the creative brief and the importance of ideas and insights in enabling integrated and trans-media communication.

The component is delivered with a focus on insights, campaigns, creative ideation processes target audiences and contemporary advertising media.

Introduces methods to rationalise and constructively reflect on design decisions in a coherent, structured and persuasive manner practically, verbally and in written form, for the purposes of presenting and developing solutions to briefs, as well as writing rationales for design projects. Students participate in an investigative practical project that is either interdisciplinary (for students who want to develop knowledge across majors) or specialist (for students who wish to deepen knowledge within their own major). Provides opportunities to integrate independent research of new concepts, contexts, processes, technologies, media and/or markets within the industry into projects in response to questions raised in briefs.

This component introduces students to portfolio development strategies, studio management theory, and small business concerns. They also extend their understanding of project management and creative strategy.

Lecturers present a variety of disciplines to investigate multidisciplinary portfolio creation approaches and self-promotional strategies. Students use this to inform the development of a portfolio representing a selection of their best work. Students return to this component to improve their work and extend their communication skills with critiques sessions. Lecturers facilitate in-class discussions and debates, students attack, defend and justify their ideas and decisions. Students enhance their ideas and their abilities to pitch ideas in class, resulting in a proposal document which may be supported with a pitch presentation.

Students are introduced to concepts of small business management and entrepreneurship necessary to run a successful studio. Learning is supported with business management case studies focusing on stakeholder needs and methods of engagement. Students present findings to support debates on central issues.

This component introduces students to a specific contemporary issue in Media Design, such as a current or emerging industrial, technological, academic, cultural or social context of key relevance to the domain of media design, in order to develop awareness of, and passion for, the wider human field in which designers operate, insight into the motivations of designers and their audiences.

Students are introduced to design disciplines, historical influences and the theories, principles and processes across the field with a focus on market research, typography, brand identity and way-finding. Advanced ideation and creative problem-solving strategies, including methods for generating and evaluating effective concepts of design communication, are incorporated. Students also strengthen their abilities to prepare clear and convincing briefs.

A systematic introduction to the best practices, standards, tools, techniques, processes, and contextual issues of graphic design as a discipline, with a focus on the basics of one discipline in particular. Using standard design research and ideation methods to develop novel solutions to briefs students create visualisations of design concepts to engage an audience, such as a client, convey narrative, and communicate potential applications for the designs. Classes focus on developing creative and technical solutions in response to graphic design briefs through technical demonstrations and practical work. Students learn to rationalise and constructively reflect on design decisions in a coherent, structured and persuasive manner both verbally and in written form.

This component consists of a single major interdisciplinary group project, where students collaborate to conceive of and produce an integrated media marketing campaign. Students are organised into interdisciplinary groups and are provided with a client brief. The component seeks to develop interpersonal skills, responsibility, initiative, and flexibility, in order to work effectively as independent practitioners and researchers, or as productive members of a team. It also delivers skills across commercial acumen, project and client management, and an understanding of business and marketing realities, including the strategic abilities to interpret and develop creative briefs; plan campaigns; recognise, adopt, forecast, and potentially innovate new concepts, contexts, processes, technologies, media and/or markets

A systematic introduction to the best practices, standards, tools, techniques, processes, and contextual issues of motion design as a discipline, with a focus on the basics of one discipline in particular. Using standard design research and ideation methods to develop novel solutions to briefs students create visualisations of design concepts to engage an audience, such as a client, convey narrative, and communicate potential applications for the designs. Classes focus on developing creative and technical solutions in response to motion design briefs through technical demonstrations and practical work. Students learn to rationalise and constructively reflect on design decisions in a coherent, structured and persuasive manner both verbally and in written form

Projects and exercises are linked to creative briefs. Students can interpret these and respond with interactive design and technical proposals, developed in Design Principles of Practice 2, which can be implemented in this component. Solutions can dovetail with projects from other majors to produce integrated campaigns, providing students with holistic understanding of the creative process.

Students gain advanced knowledge of design theory and are introduced to the psychology of design, ethics and sustainability. Students continue to develop a common vocabulary and understanding of the major concerns of graphic design enabling them to better analyse work.

Projects linked to creative briefs enable students to respond with graphic design solutions that work in conjunction with other majors to produce integrated campaigns. A similar process can be utilised in Contextual Studies 2 to drive practical investigations in this component, as well as design discussions in theory classes. This provides students with holistic understanding of the creative process.

Students design, construct and document a body of work that addresses the proposal developed in the Design Portfolio for an end-of-year exhibition. Students collaborate in pairs or on team projects as long as their role in the project and their specific individual aims are clearly expressed in the project brief. This final body of work will represent the culmination of the degree process and should also represent the students’ perspective as emerging professional designers.

Portfolio development focuses on developing insight into the student’s specific strengths and weaknesses, self-promotional skills, and awareness of how they could fit into industry as professionals, preparing them for the Capstone Project: Practice-based Inquiry and future employment.

An advanced program that focuses on best practices, standards, tools, techniques, processes, and contextual issues of motion design as a discipline, with a focus on developing the skills and knowledge required for employment in the field of motion design.

Using standard design research and ideation methods to develop novel solutions to briefs students create visualisations of design concepts to engage an audience, such as a client, convey narrative, and communicate potential applications for the designs.

Building on the skills gained in Motion Design Studio 1, classes focus on developing creative and technical solutions in response to motion design briefs through technical demonstrations and practical work. Students learn to rationalise and constructively reflect on design decisions in a coherent, structured and persuasive manner both verbally and in written form.

This subject builds on the practical and conceptual skills and knowledge the students gained from Interactive Design 1. Focus will be given on using CMS and tools used in the industry when creating websites, and the design of mobile applications. Students will also work through concept development, prototyping, validation and testing phases to improve and refine a user experience design in relation to the requirements of a specific client brief. Throughout, students will develop their knowledge and skillset in terms of creating usable and user-centred interactive design experiences

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Frequently asked questions - BACHELOR OF MEDIA DESIGN

Yes, all Torrens University Australia qualifications are government-accredited and nationally recognised. In addition, Torrens University Australia maintains close industry links.

Torrens University Australia has campuses located in Sydney, Brisbane, Melbourne and Adelaide. All campuses are centrally situated, close to public transport and cultural/commercial precincts enabling ease of access and connection to services.

There are three major intakes per year for each Torrens University Australia course, plus special, mid-term intakes may also be available. You can enrol anytime during the year and start in the semester of your choice. However, do note that there is a maximum of 25 students per class so it’s important you enrol early to secure your place.

Contact your consultant now for information on available spots in the next intake.

SAll students require a laptop to bring to classes.

Hardware minimum specs:

Mac OS

  • Mac OS X Lion 10.7 or higher
  • Multicore Intel processor (Dual core i5 minimum)
  • 8GB RAM
  • 500GB hard drive
  • 2GB graphics processor

PC

  • Windows 7 or higher
  • Multicore Intel processor (Dual core i5 minimum)
  • 14-inch screen or larger or a minimum resolution of1400x900 pixels
  • 8GB RAM
  • 500GB hard drive
  • 2GB graphics processor

Software requirements:

  • Microsoft Office (Home and Student suite) 2010 or later version
  • Adobe Creative Suite Creative Cloud (Student and Teacher Edition)

Depending on your major, we would also recommend owning:

  • Cinema 4D (Motion Design) – this is optional as the software will be available on campus in our computer labs
  • Ketch (Interactive Design)

We recommend students purchase a subscription membership with Adobe Creative Cloud (Student and Teacher Edition). We suggest the ‘Complete — Student version’, which is heavily discounted and provides full access to all Adobe applications. At time of writing, it is advertised at $28.59/month.

For more detail, visit Australian Adobe site: https://creative.adobe.com/plans?store_code=au

Please Note: Internet access is required for software activation and validation of subscription, as well as to online services.